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Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage

Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage
Painting The Daimler-Benz Ambush Camouflage Scheme
with Blake Coster

In my last article, I provided some background information on the two Hinterhalt-Tarnung or Ambush camouflage schemes applied to the Panther G between August – September, 1944. In this article I will demonstrate how to re-create the ‘Dot’ Ambush camouflage scheme applied by the Daimler-Benz factory on the Flames Of War Panther G (Late) miniature.

Read part one of Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage here…
Read part three of Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage here...
Read part four of Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage here...

Since everyone has their own way of painting, I’m going to show two different methods of re-creating the ‘Dot’ Ambush scheme. There are some common steps within both processes but I will separate out the two approaches as best I can. Whichever method you choose, with a little patience and care I know you’ll end up with some great looking Panthers, whether this is your first, fourth or fourteenth Flames Of War army! So let’s get started.

Right: Our goal; a fully painted Panther G (Late) finished in the Daimler-Benz 'Dot' Ambush scheme. This example has been contructed using the new plastic components.

Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage
Painting 'Dot' Ambush Camouflage
I’ve assembled my Panther G (Late) using the new plastic components and primed the model using Black (FWP300). This is my personal preference; feel free to use whatever method you prefer. After priming, I’ve temporarily attached the turret and the hull to some empty paint pots to give me with something to hold as I apply the camouflage scheme.

Next, I’ve applied the Dunkelgelb (Dark Yellow) base colour; a quick and easy way to do this is to use Panther Yellow (Mid / Late) from the War Paint spray can range (i.e. CWP210). But if you are unsure of what colour to use or are looking for a suggested colour guide,
Jeremy has done all the hard work for you and has written a guide to painting Dunkelgelb.

Read Jeremy's Painting Dunkelgelb article here...
Below: The Panther G (Late) fully assembled, primed and with the Dark Yellow base colour.
Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage

Step One: Planning
When attempting this scheme, or any camouflage scheme for that matter, I strongly suggest that you take some time to plan out exactly how you’d like the scheme to look on the vehicle. The internet is a valuable tool for this; a quick image search can provide plenty of examples to get those creative juices flowing. Each one is different; if you need to draw out the rough shape of the Panther from different angles and use some coloured pencils or felt tip pens to outline the scheme you intend to apply to your model then do so while others maybe more comfortable with just a few reference photos or just picking up a brush and going for it!


With that in mind, my friend Sean (a member of the Battlefront Graphic Design team) has created a PDF that you can download and use to plan out your Panther camouflage schemes.

Download a PDF of the Panther Camouflage Scheme Planner here…

Step Two: Applying The Olive Green and Red Brown
Once you’ve planned out your scheme, it’s time to transfer it to the miniature. For my Olive Green colour I will use Army Green (FWP342) and Battlefield Brown (FWP324) for my Red Brown colour. But first I apply an outline of each colour on the model, making sure that I follow my plan; to do this I’ve use a very thin application of each colour so I know exactly where each colour is going to be applied when the time comes.
Below: The outline of Olive Green and Red Brown on the turret.
Below: The outline of Olive Green and Red Brown on the hull.
Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage

The Hand Painted Method
To apply the Olive Green and Red Brown colours by hand it is best to build up the colour slowly; the application of a few light coats is better than a single thick coat. Begin by filling in each area with the intended colour then start building up the colour.

The best way to apply the paint is by working your way around the model. Apply a thin coat to one area then move onto the next; this way, by the time you've completed a full circuit the first area should be dry and ready for the next coat. Continue this process till you’ve built up a colour density that you’re happy with. Once you've completed the Olive Green move onto the Red Brown colour and repeat the process. But most importantly, remember to take your time.

Below: The Olive Green patches applied to our Panther hull the old fashioned way; with a brush! Below: The Olive Green and Red Brown now fully applied to the turret and hull of our Panther.
Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage
Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage
The Airbrushed Method
If you’re lucky enough to own or have access to an airbrush, the Olive Green and Red Brown can be quickly applied using this method. Be sure to use the appropriate colours and thin the paint to the correct consistency; the consistency of milk is what is usually recommended. Don't forget to clean the airbrush once you've finished!
Below: The Olive Green patches applied using an airbrush. Below: The Olive Green and Red Brown now fully applied to the turret and hull of our Panther G, using an airbrush.
Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage
Step Three: Applying the Dots
Now that we have our Olive Green and Red Brown applied to our miniature and we’re happy with the coverage, it’s time to add the contrasting dots. Remember, on the patches of Olive Green and Red Brown the dots are Dark Yellow while Olive Green dots are applied to any areas where the Dark Yellow base colour can be seen.
Below: The Olive Green 'Dots' applied. Below: The Dark Yellow 'Dots' applied.
Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage
I found that the quickest and easiest way of applying these dots is using something like a thin piece of wire, a bristle from a broom or even a whisker from a cat (but don’t go committing any acts of animal cruelty; often a loose whisker can be found near your beloved feline’s favourite sleeping spots)! Of course, you can also apply them in a more tradition manner i.e. a paint brush.
Below: The Olive Green 'Dots' applied. Below: The Dark Yellow 'Dots' applied.
Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage Hinterhalt: The Art of Panther Camouflage
To apply the dots, simply dip the end of your chosen tool, i.e. a cat whisker in this case, into the paint and ensure that you remove any excess, so that when you lightly touch the model with the applcator it won’t create too large a dot. A quick practice on a scrap piece of paper wouldn't hurt either. My only other tip is not to apply too many dots, sometimes less is more.

Once you’ve completed adding the dots then it’s time to move onto painting the rest of the miniatures. I’ll take these examples home with me; apply a wash, paint the details etc, so I have some finished examples to show you at the end of this series of articles.

Join me next time as I attempt to replicate the ‘Disc’ Ambush scheme (Gulp!) applied to the Panther G (Late) by the MAH and MNH factories.


~ Blake.


Last Updated On Monday, June 22, 2015 by George at Battlefront